English for Academic Purposes: Materials

Listening Comprehension and Note-Taking

 1 Introduction

1.0 Introduction

1.1 Introduction to note-taking skills

1.2 The purpose of note-taking

1.3 How to take notes

1.4 Abbreviations and symbols

2 Understanding meaning

2.0 Introduction

2.1 Spoken language / Recognising spoken sentences

2.2 Understanding relations within the sentence / complex sentences

2.3 Understanding intonation, voice emphasis etc.

2.4 Importance markers

2.5 Deducing the meaning of unfamiliar words and word groups

2.6 Understanding explicitly stated information

2.7 Recognising implications: information not explicitly stated

2.8 Understanding conceptual meaning, e.g. comparison, purpose, cause, effect

2.9 Recognising the speaker's attitude

3 Understanding relationships in the lecture/discussion/demonstration

3.1 Understanding the communicative value of sentences

3.2 Understanding relations between the parts of a lecture through lexical cohesion devices

3.3 Understanding relations between parts of a lecture through grammatical cohesion devices

3.4 Understanding relations between parts of a lecture by recognising indicators in discourse

3.5 Understanding the lecture by going outside it

4 Evaluating the importance of information

4.1 Recognising the sections of a talk

4.2 Recognising repeated or reformulated information

4.3 Distinguishing the main ideas from supporting material

4.4 Recognising unsupported claims and claims supported by evidence: fact from opinion

4.5 Following an argument

4.6 Listening critically / evaluating the text

5 Listening skills

5.0 The listening process: how we listen

5.1 Skimming: listening to obtain gist

5.2 Scanning: listening to obtain specific information

5.3 Ignoring irrelevant information

5.4 Selective extraction of relevant points

5.5 Extracting salient points to summarise text

5.6 Following instructions

Materials

1. Introduction

1.0. Introduction

Heaton & Dunmore (1992, chap. 6)
James, Jordan & Matthews (1979)
Lynch (1983)
Mason (1983)
Salimbene (1982, chap. 2)
Waters & Waters (1995, chap. 6)

1.1. Introduction to note-taking skills

Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
Heaton & Dunmore (1992, chap. 5&10)
James, Jordan & Matthews (1979)
Lynch (1983, chap. 1)
Rowntree (1976, chap. 7)
Wallace (1980, chap. 3)
Waters & Waters (1995, chap.5)

1.2. The purpose of note-taking

Wallace (1980, chap.. 3)

1.3. How to take notes

Adkins & McKean (1985)
Espeseth (1999, pp. 10, 28-29, 41, 43, 56, 57, 135,)
James, Jordan & Matthews (1979, pp. 10-11)
Lynch (1983, chap. 6)
Wallace (1980, chap. 3)
Waters & Waters (1995, pp. 66-80)
Williams, R. (1982)
Yorkey (1982, chap. 7)

1.4. Abbreviations and symbols

Adkins & McKean (1985, chap. 2)
Espeseth (1999, pp. 26)
Lynch (1983, chap. 6)
Wallace (1980, chap. 3)
Yorkey (1982, chap. 7)

2. Understanding meaning

2.0. Introduction

Adkins & McKean (1985)
Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
Jordan (1984)
Lynch (1983)

2.1. Spoken language / Recognising spoken sentences

Jordan (1984)
Lynch (1983, chs. 2 & 5)
Salehzadeh (2006, ch. 2)

2.2. Understanding relations within sentences / complex sentences

2.3. Understanding intonation, voice emphasis, etc

Jordan (1984)
Lynch (1983, chap. 2)

2.4. Importance markers

Lynch (1993, chap. 4)
Espeseth (1999, p. 54)

2.5. Deducing the meaning of unfamiliar words and word groups

Lynch (1983, chap. 5)
Espeseth (1999, pp. 11, 13, 29, 42, 44, 55-56, 81, 83, 97, 109, 121-123, 136)

2.6. Understanding explicitly stated information

2.7. Understanding implications: information not explicitly stated

Geddes (1988, chap. 3.7)
Espeseth (1999, pp. 7, 21, 27, 38)

2.8. Understanding conceptual meaning: e.g. comparison, purpose, cause, effect

Lynch (1983, chap. 7, 8, 9, & 10)

2.9. Recognising speaker's attitude

3. Understanding relationships in the lecture etc

3.1. Understanding the communicative value of sentences

Lynch (1983)

3.2. Understanding relations between parts of a lecture through lexical cohesion devices

 Lynch (1983, chap. 13)

3.3. Understanding relations between parts of a lecture through grammatical cohesion devices

3.4. Understanding relations between parts of a lecture by recognising indicators in discourse

Lynch (1983, chs 8 & 13)
Salehzadeh (2006, ch. 3)
Wallace (1980, pp. 57-)

3.5. Understanding the lecture by going outside it

4. Evaluating the importance of information

4.1. Recognising the sections of a talk

Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
Lynch (1983, chap. 13)
Wallace (1980, pp. 62-, 76-)

4.2. Recognising repeated or reformulated information

Geddes (1988, chap. 6)
Lynch (1983, chap. 14)

4.3. Distinguishing the main ideas from supporting material

Espeseth (1999, p. 68)
Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
Heaton & Dunmore (1992, pp. 74-75)
Wallace (1980)

4.4. Recognising unsupported claims and claims supported by evidence: fact from opinion

Lynch (1983)

4.5. Following an argument

Lynch (1983, chap. 15)
Salehzadeh (2006, pp. 55-72)

4.6. Listening critically / evaluating the text

5. Listening skills

5.0. The listening process

Fairfax & Trzeciak (1999, Unit 1)
Salehzadeh (2006, ch. 1)

5.1. Skimming: listening to obtain gist

Lynch (1983)

5.2. Scanning: listening to obtain specific information

 Espeseth (1999, pp. 5, 6, 35, 63, 75, 76, 82, 104, 115, 131)

5.3. Ignoring irrelevant information

Espeseth (1999, p. 36)
Lynch (1983)

5.4. Selective extraction of relevant points

Lynch (1983)

5.5. Extracting salient points to summarise text

Espeseth (1999, pp. 12-13, 18-19, 37, 50, 65, 70-71, 90, 103, 137)
Geddes (1988, chap. 4)
Lynch (1983)

5.6. Following instructions

Espeseth (1999, pp. 3, 16, 18-19)
Jordan (1982)
Jordan (1984, chap. 4)
McDowell & Stevens (1982, chaps. 6 & 7)
Todd (1981, chaps. 10 & 11)