English for Academic Purposes: Materials

Speaking in academic contexts

 1 Introduction

1.0 Introduction

1.1 The purpose of seminars

1.2 Making notes to speak from

1.3 Using notes to speak from

1.4 Pronunciation - voice

1.5 Spoken language

1.6 Using visual aids

2 Making a presentation

2.1 The structure of presentations

2.2 Introducing the topic

2.3 Making a statement of intention

2.4 Giving the information in detail

2.4.0 Introduction

2.4.1 Defining terms

2.4.2 Description

2.4.3 Sequencing

2.4.4 Describing graphs and figures

2.4.5 Describing similarities and differences / Comparing and contrasting

2.4.6 Illustrating a point - giving examples and referring to research

2.4.7 Amplification of a point

2.4.8 Explaining a point

2.4.9 Emphasising a point

2.5 Checking that people are following

2.6 Summarising and concluding

2.7 Inviting others to contribute

3 Controlling the discussion

3.1 Chairing the discussion

3.2 Changing the subject - moving on

3.3 Speeding up things

3.4 Directing the discussion

3.5 Drawing attention to a breakdown in communication

3.6 Coming to a conclusion

4 Participating in the discussion

4.0 Introduction

4.1 Interrupting politely

4.2 Asking questions - asking for more information/clarification

4.3 Stating a point of view - supporting your view

4.4 Agreeing and disagreeing - challenging and commenting

4.5 Making suggestions

4.6 Checking - making sure that you have understood

4.7 Holding the floor - preventing interruptions

5 Listening and note taking

5.0Introduction

5.1 Recognising important points

5.2 Distinguishing fact from opinion

5.3 Recognising indicators in discourse

5.4 Extracting salient points to summarise

5.5 Note taking

Materials

1. Introduction

1.0. Introduction

Barnes (1992, chap. 7)
Barrass (1982, pp. 124-128)
Brieger & Comfort (1994, chap. 11)
Comfort (1995)
Cottrell (1999, chap. 5)
Day (1989, chap. 139)
Drew & Bingham (1997, pp. 89-93)
Harmer & Arnold (1978, Intro)
Heaton & Dunmore (1992, chap. 7)
Huckin & Olsen (1991, chap. 19)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987, appendix)
Lewin (2010, chap. 12)
Northedge (1990, pp. 55-64)
Reid (2000, pp. 130-133)
Romanoff (1991, pp. 123-125)
Rowntree (1967, chap. 6)
Turner (2002, pp. 89-90)
Wallace (1980, chap. 4)
Waters & Waters (1995, chap. 7)
Zobel (2004, pp. 225-234)

1.1. The purpose of seminars

Cottrell (1999, p. 100)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987, chap. 9)
Northedge (1990. pp. 56-60)
Penrose & Katz (1998, chap. 5) )
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, pp. 112-113)
Turner (2002, pp. 91-92)
Wallace (1980, chap. 4)
Wallace (2004, pp. 119-123)

1.2. Making notes to speak from

Wallace (1980, chap. 4)
Waters & Waters, (1995, chap. 5)

1.3. Using notes to speak from

Wallace (1980, chap. 4)

1.4. Pronunciation - voice

Bell (2008, pp. 10, 17, 24-25, 37, )
Cottrell (1999, p. 91)
Drew & Bingham (1997, pp. 98-100)
Hewings (1995)
Huckin & Olsen (1991, chap. 38)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chaps. 2. 3 & 6; Extension Work)
O'Connor (1980)
Powell (1996, chap. 3)

1.5. Spoken language

Comfort (1995, chap. 4)
Powell (1996, pp. 92-102)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1994, chap. 11)

1.6 Using visual aids

Bell (2008, ch. 5)
Drew & Bingham (1997, pp. 96-97)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, chap. 4)
McCormack & Watkins (2007, pp.  42-44)
Powell (1996, chap. 2)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 32)
Zobel (2004, pp. 234-248)

2. Making a presentation

2.0. Introduction

Comfort (1993, chap. 1 & 2)
Cottrell (1999, p. 100)
Espeseth (1999, pp. 8, 79, 119)
Ellis, N. & O'Driscoll (1992, p. 7)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987, chap. 9)
McCormack & Watkins (2007, pp.  10-12, 26-28)
Northedge (1990. p. 63)
Powell (1996, chap. 1)
Wallace (2004, pp. 1214-130)

2.1. The structure of presentations

Bell (2008, ch. 1)
Comfort (1995, chap. 3)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, p. 7)
Glendinning & Howard (2007, pp. 126-127)
Gregory (2005, pp. 115-117)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987, chap. 6)
McCormack & Slaght (2005, pp. 80-81)
Penrose & Katz (1998, chap. 5) )
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 14, 114, 115-117)
Waters & Waters (1995, pp. 84-85)

2.2. Introducing the topic

Bell (2008, pp. 5-7, 12-20, 31-39)
Comfort (1995, chap. 2)
Glendinning & Howard (2007, pp. 126-127)
Madden & Rohlck (1997, p. 64-66)

2.3. Making a statement of intention

Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, p. 8)
Harmer & Arnold (1978, chap. 3)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987, chap.9)
Powell (1996, pp. 11-14)

2.4. Giving the information in detail

2.4.0. Introduction

Bell (2008, pp. 5-7)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, chap. 2)
Madden & Rohlck (1997,  p. 64-66)
Waters & Waters (1995, pp. 84-85)

2.4.1. Defining terms

Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chap. 3)
McCormack & Watkins (2007, pp.  41-42)
Reinhart (2002, chap. 4)

2.4.2. Description

Kayfetz & Smith (1992, chap. 5)
Reinhart (2002, chap. 2)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 131)

2.4.3. Sequencing

Brieger & Comfort (1993 chap. 14 & 15)
Heaton & Dunmore (1992, pp. 50-51)
Jones (1981, chap. 14)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chap. 1)
Reinhart (2002, chap. 3)

2.4.4. Describing graphs and figures

Brieger & Comfort (1993, 1994)
Comfort (1995, chap. 5)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, chap. 2)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chap. 2)
Madden & Rohlck (1997, p. 82-104)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, pp. 132-133)

2.4.5. Describing similarities and differences / Comparing and contrasting

Arnold & Harmer (1978, chap. 9)
Campbell (1983, chap. 6)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, chap. 3)
Glendinning and Mantell (1983, chap. 4)
Hamp Lyons & Heasley (1987, chap.5)
Johnson (1981, chap. 6)
Jones (1981, chap. 10)
Jordan (1990, chap. 8)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 129)
Trzeciak & Mackay (1994, chap. 3)
White & McGovern (1994, chap. 3)

2.4.6. Illustrating a point: giving examples and referring to research

Hargreaves & Fletcher (1981, chaps. 8 & 9)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chap. 4)

2.4.7. Amplification of a point

Heaton & Dunmore (1992, pp. 50-53)

2.4.8. Explaining a point

Hargreaves & Fletcher (1981)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chap. 4)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, chap.2.3.7; p. 131)

2.4.9. Emphasising a point

Bell (2008, ch.6)
Brieger & Comfort (1994, chap. 4 & 5)
Hargreaves & Fletcher (1981)
Powell (1996, chap. 4.5)

2.5. Checking that people are following

Harmer & Arnold (1978, Int C)
James (1984, p. 78)

2.6. Summarising and concluding

Bell (2008, p.18)
Comfort (1995, chap. 7)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, chap. 5)
Glendinning & Howard (2007, pp. 126-127)
James (1978, p. 78)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chap. 7)
Madden & Rohlck (1997, p. 56-60, 72-73)

2.7. Inviting others to contribute

Drew & Bingham (1997, pp.229-233)
Comfort (1995, chap. 7)
Ellis & O'Driscoll (1992, chap. 6)
Harmer & Arnold (1978, Int C)
James (1978, p. 78)
Jones (1981, chap. 5)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chap. 7)
Powell (1996, chap. 7)

3. Controlling the discussion

3.1. Chairing the discussion

Barnes (1992, pp. 90-92)
Brieger & Comfort (1993, chap. 20)
James (1984, p. 78)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chap. 8)

3.2. Changing the subject - moving on

Harmer & Arnold (1978, Int C)
James (1984, p. 78)

3.3. Speeding up things

James (1984, p. 78)

3.4. Directing the discussion

James (1984, p. 78)
Jones (1981, chap. 5)

3.5. Drawing attention to a breakdown in communication

James (1984, p. 78)

3.6. Coming to a conclusion

James (1984, p. 78)

4. Participating in the discussion

4.0. Introduction

McCormack & Watkins (2007, pp. 15-16)
Waters & Waters (1995, 85-89)

4.1. Interrupting politely

Brieger & Comfort (1993, chap. 21)
Harmer & Arnold (1978, Int C)
James (1984, p. 77)
Jones (1981, chap. 5)

4.2. Asking questions - asking for more information/clarification

Bell (2008, ch. 3)
Brieger & Comfort (1993, chap. 16 & 17)
Espeseth (1999, p. 93)
James (1984, p. 77)
Jones (1981, chap. 2)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chap. 5)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chaps. 4 & 5)
Madden & Rohlck (1997, p. 46-47, 105-112)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, chap. 1.1.4; pp. 126-127)

4.3. Stating a point of view - supporting your view

Bell (2008, ch. 6)
Hargreaves & Fletcher (1981)
Harmer & Arnold (1978, Int C)
James (1984, p. 78)
Jones (1981, chap. 8)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chaps. 4 & 10)
Madden & Rohlck (1997, p. 47)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 135)

4.4. Agreeing and disagreeing - challenging and commenting

Barnes (1993. pp. 93-94)
Brieger & Comfort (1993, chap. 21)
Hargreaves & Fletcher (1981)
Harmer & Arnold (1978, chap. 3)
Jones (1981, chap. 8)
Kayfetz & Stice (1987 chaps. 4, 6 & 10)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chap. 8)
Madden & Rohlck (1997, p. 48-49)
McCormack & Watkins (2007, pp.  8-10)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 125)
Wallace (1980, pp. 77-78)

4.5. Making suggestions

Brieger & Comfort (1993, chap. 22)
James (1984, p. 78)
Jones (1981, chap. 11)

4.6. Checking - making sure you have understood

Harmer & Arnold (1978, Int C)
James (1984, p. 78)
Lynch & Anderson (1992, chap. 4)
McCormack & Watkins (2007, pp.  34-35)
Rignall & Furneaux (1997, p. 139)

4.7. Holding the floor - preventing interruptions

James (1984, p. 78)
Jones (1981, chap. 5)

5. Listening and note taking

5.0. Introduction

Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
James, Jordan & Matthews (1979)
Lynch (1983, chap. 1)
Rowntree (1976, chap. 7)
Wallace (1980, chap. 3)
Waters & Waters (1995, chap.5)

5.1. Recognising important points

Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
Wallace (1980)

5.2. Distinguishing fact from opinion

Lynch (1983)

5.3. Recognising indicators in discourse

Lynch (1983, chaps. 8 & 13)
Wallace (1980, pp. 57-58)

5.4. Extracting salient points to summarise

Geddes (1988, chap. 4)
Lynch (1983)

5.5. Note taking

Ferguson & O'Reilly (1977)
James, Jordan & Matthews (1979)
Lynch (1983, chap. 1)
Rowntree (1976, chap. 7)
Wallace (1980, chap. 3)
Waters & Waters (1995, chap.5)